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Home > CURE FOR HEARING LOSS & TINNITUS > HRP CONSORTIUM PROJECTS
 
 
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Hearing Restoration Project: Consortium Projects
The first four HRP research projects commenced in May 2012 and were renewed for a second year of funding beginning May 2013.  One new HRP project was also initiated in May 2013.
 
Learn about the goals of each project and their progress toward a cure for hearing loss and tinnitus by clicking on each one below.
 
Andrew Groves Ph.D., Baylor College of Medicine
Neil Segil Ph.D., University of Southern California
Deafness due to the loss of sensory hair cells is the defining problem of the HRP consortium. Since the discovery of hair cell regeneration in non-mammalian vertebrates over 20 years ago, the challenge of manipulating mammalian supporting cells to induce hair cell regeneration has been of primary importance to the field.
 
Michael Lovett, Ph.D., Washington University
Jennifer Stone, Ph.D., University of Washington
Mark Warchol, Ph.D., Washington University
The underlying cause of most hearing disorders can be traced to defects in the inner ear.  Sensory function in the inner ear is mediated by hair cells, which convert sound vibrations into electrical signals that are conveyed to the brain.  Hair cells can be injured or lost as a result of noise exposure, ototoxic medications, inner ear infections, or as part of normal aging.
 
Albert Edge Ph.D, Harvard Medical School
Stefan Heller, Ph.D., Stanford University
Elizabeth Oesterle Ph.D., University of Washington
The damaged organ of Corti, after the loss of hair cells, undergoes morphological changes.  These morphological changes are dependent on the type of hair cell loss where loss of outer hair cells results in a preservation of the tunnel of Corti and Pillar cells (Oesterle and Campbell, 2009).
 
Tatjana Piotrowski Ph.D., Stowers Institute for Medical Research
David W. Raible Ph.D., University of Washington
In non-mammalian vertebrates hair cells regenerate from support cells. Yet, no systematic effort to study support stems cells in these system has been executed. It is not known, for instance, where the stem cells reside, or if a specialized progenitor population exists.
 
Beginning May 2013
 
Andrew Groves Ph.D., Baylor College of Medicine
Neil Segil Ph.D., University of Southern California
Jennifer Stone, Ph.D., University of Washington
Since the discovery of hair cell regeneration in non-mammalian vertebrates over 20 years ago, the challenge of promoting mammalian supporting cells to yield new hair cells after damage has been of primary importance to the field.  Two major obstacles confront our efforts: the mature organ of Corti fails to regenerate hair cells after damage, and it rapidly degenerates in culture.
 
 
 
 
 
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